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 WELCOME TO MY BLOG! REFLECTIONS OF A SINGLE WOMAN'S LIFE ON AN OLD FARM.

Wednesday, June 13, 2018

Drama du Jour

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Randy Rooster was making a great fuss yesterday afternoon, but since he does this fairly regularly, I paid little attention. That was a mistake. Had I rushed out to see what the drama du jour was, I might have prevented the murder, but alas I didn't. When I did step out the back door to head for the barn I was stunned to see a magnificent red fox standing in the lower pasture-with one of the big black hens securely clamped in his jaws.

Since there really wasn't anything to be done at that point, I ran for the camera and while Mr. Fox politely posed with his prey he didn't retreat until I crawled through the high tensile fence and headed toward him hoping to get a clearer photo. At that point he dropped his dinner and fled into the bush, but I knew he'd return. Corky hurried to the scene of the crime to pay his last respects.

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As expected, he did return later that evening to collect his KFC dinner (Karen's Fresh Chicken), so today the grieving mini-flock is in lock-up, much to their dismay, but for their own safe keeping.

It seems the abduction had actually commenced inside the donkeys' stall. Such vulpine boldness! It was easy to follow the trail of feathers to where the perpetrator was caught in the act.

Fortunately (or not...) another hen is setting on five eggs, safely confined in the hay room, so with a bit of luck she will hatch pullets, not cockerels ina couple of weeks. To be continued.

5:26 pm edt          Comments

Monday, May 14, 2018

Gone, but not forgotten.

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When I bought this old farm my neighbors were old farmers. Traffic was generally of the tractor variety, so not much at all. But,as Bob Dylan sang, 'The times, they are a'changin.' The old farmers died and for a long time their land was leased to mega-farmers who were not local. They'd arrive each spring with huge costly equipment, prepare the fields, plant corn and beans that they'd harvest in the fall and then vanish. That's just how it was--until recently. 

The field to the north sold and the new home under construction is all the chatter on the road, although most of it is speculation; owners in their 40's, no kids, just a dog and they drive expensive cars. Sounds good to me, especially the no kids and just a dog part. 

But, to the east, the changes are rather worrisome as that property directly adjoins this one. Until several months ago the occupants were a quiet old man who liked to mow his grass and his middle-aged son who waved when he drove down the road. Never any problems unless the old guy decided to shoot a skunk from his bathroom window at 2:00 AM. Then he died and relatives who had never been seen before arrived like ants at a picnic and all peace and quiet disappeared.They were the dukes of hazard and that's where an event occured last week that emphasized just how much has changed around here.

Loud profanity sifted through the trees that balmy afternoon. Odd, I thought, but not my business until the altercation escalated. Around these parts, any cussing disagreements take place behind closed doors if they take place at all. (We like to think we are all quite civilized....) Then, the ambulance arrived.

Flashing lights and the beep, beep, beep of a backing vehicle drew me from my office to creep down the nature trail to investigate. Peeking around pine trees that border my property and that where the dukes had been having their dispute I saw two strange women wringing their hands as an EMT worked on a strange man lying flat out in the middle of the lawn. 'Not my business, I reminded myself and returned to my office, but 45 minutes later I crept back to the pines for another peek.

The fellow who had been on the ground was on a gurney being loaded into the ambulance. This is only remarkable because nearly a week later absolutely no one on the road, nor anyone else knows anything about the incident. Who were these people? Was someone shot, stabbed, knocked out? A heart attack perhaps? No one has a clue--or cares. It's not even road gossip.

I miss the old days when tractors driven by old men in dirty coveralls sputtered up the road; old guys like Kenny. I miss him and his farm (pictured above before it was razed) where despite all the junk that littered the place, it represented a quieter time. Everyone looked out for Kenny. We took his free-ranging cows home when they wandered down the road and we all mourned when he died. I miss Mr. G, the oddball who lived further down the road and rode a mule that was more suited for a ten year old than for a grown man. The saddle he plunked on the little molly was big enough for a Percheron horse. He was a curious sight and he frequently elicited tsk, tsks from neighbors, but like Kenny, he's also gone. I miss Mr. C. who looked like an old movie star, chattered away like a squirrel and who used to plow a ridiculously-large garden plot for me.Even the guy from what was locally called Filthy Farm was a popular subject of road gossip, especially when the manure in his barn grew so copius that it blew out a side wall. Later, the fire department used that barn for a 'training drill' but they weren't aware of the explosives hidden in the rafters. That sure woke things up around here and provided fodder for lots of talk.

But, all that has changed. Now a supine stranger being hauled off in an ambulance doesn't even rate road gossip. I miss the way things were.

 

1:48 pm edt          Comments

12:18 pm edt          Comments

Sunday, April 29, 2018

Old World Homes

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In the field north of this farm, construction of yet another new house is about to get underway. Pink flags mark where the driveway will be and further back more flags define the position of the proposed house. The sign at the edge of the road identifies the builder as Old World Homes.

In three years my own house will be 200 years old and it's as sturdy today as it was when John Grog (Graugh) built it in 1821. I like to think about all the people that have called this place home since it rose from a landscape I can only imagine. The stair treads are cupped from countless feet that have trudged up to the still-unheated second floor and in the winter icy drafts creep across the floors despite my efforts to caulk the leaks. All of the doorways slope at awkward angles, but that's okay. Sturdy though it may be, it's far from perfect, but it's perfect for me.

I look at the exposed post and beam construction with its hand hewn timbers, mortised joints and big whittled pegs and wonder how long it took to build this simple shelter. I'm sure it took longer than it will take to build the new Old World Home.

 

5:55 pm edt          Comments

Tuesday, April 10, 2018

A Mouse in the House--Again...

 

 

 "Mouse? What mouse? I'm half blind," says Henry.

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There is a mouse under the floor of the bathroom shower and the scratching skittering sounds are making the cats crazy. I suspect this is the same brazen rodent that ran fast as a race car through the living room last week with three cats and one dog in hot pursuit. He successfully evaded all of them and made his escape.

Based upon previous experience with shower dwelling mice, the problem is that once under the fiberglass floor, the not-so-clever fellows forget how to get out and eventually expire there. FYI: It takes about three weeks for eau de death to dissipate or for me to just become nose blind to the stink.  I suspect that Miss Pittypat, (the most recent feral feline to show up here) is a better mouser than the four fat freeloaders currently in residence.

I first saw the calico a couple of months ago crouched in the field north of the barn. It was one of those rare sunny days and what first appeared to be a round rock was actually Miss P. trying to warm herself. I spoke to her and she bolted, not to be seen again until this week.  The poor creature was eating bean nachos that I'd brought home from a disappointing dinner at a Mexican restaurant.  She ate the entire Styrofoam container of the dismal fare (rejected by the hens).  She was later seen fleeing from the garden shed where I'm now putting more appropriate cat food. The plan is to trap and spay her and then if she is so inclined she can live comfortably at the barn.  To be continued....

 

9:27 pm edt          Comments

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